Ponte Vecchio, Florence Italy

The most striking and oldest bridge in Florence still in existence is the Ponte Vecchio, literally: the old bridge. The Ponte Vecchio was designed by a student of Giotto, Taddeo Gaddi and was finished in 1345. The Ponte Vecchio is known for the many shops on and around the bridge, which used to be the domain of blacksmiths, tanners and butchers. They used the Arno river in Florence as a landfill. However, Duke Fernandino made sure they left because they caused too much noise and stench. They were replaced by jewelers and goldsmiths, who could also pay a higher rent.

The Ponte Vecchio is said to have existed since Roman times. The bridge was then only made of wood and after the flooding of the bridge in 1333, the Ponte Vecchio was rebuilt in stone in 1345. The bridge consists of three arches, of which the middle one is the largest at thirty meters in length. In the center of the bridge is a bust of Benvenuto Cellini, an Italian artist who started his career as a goldsmith on Ponte Vecchio. The bridge was not destroyed by the Germans in World War II, but a torrent in 1966 was less favorable to the bridge, causing a lot of gold capital to disappear in the Arno.

People who have read Dan Brown’s Inferno have heard of the Corridoio Vasariano, Vasari’s secret corridor. This elevated corridor crosses the shops of the Ponte Vecchio and connects the Palazzo Vecchio with the Pitti Palace. Vasari designed this secret corridor on behalf of Cosimo I so that he and his family could move between his two palaces without being seen by the people. The Corridoio Vasariano is almost a kilometer in distance. At first there were four towers on the Ponte Vecchio. Three of the four were demolished during the construction of the Corridoio Vasariano. The fourth tower, that of the Mannelli family, was saved; the Vasari corridor had to be built around this by means of support beams. Unfortunately, the Corridoio Vasariana is under restoration, which means that the secret corridor is presumably not open until 2022 with guided tours.

The Accademia Gallery, Florence Italy

The Accademia Gallery is Florence’s most visited museum right after the Uffizi Gallery. The original statue of Michelangelo’s famous David actually has made the Accademia the most popular museum in Florence, thus making the statue the most admired work in all of Florence’s museums and top sights in all of Italy.

Milan Cathedral Duomo di Milano, Italy

Milan Cathedral is the cathedral church of Milan, Lombardy, Italy. Dedicated to the Nativity of St Mary, it is the seat of the Archbishop of Milan. The cathedral took nearly six centuries to complete: construction began in 1386, and the final details were completed in 1965. Milan Cathedral, called Duomo di Milano in Italian, is a vast Gothic-style cathedral, located in the heart of Milan. It is 515 ft (157 metres) long and 302 ft (92 m) wide. It can house up to 40.000 people. Duomo di Milano is one of the largest Catholic churches in the world.

Venice City of Canals, Italy

Venice, the capital of northern Italy’s Veneto region, is built on more than 100 small islands in a lagoon in the Adriatic Sea. It has no roads, just canals – including the Grand Canal thoroughfare – lined with Renaissance and Gothic palaces. The central square, Piazza San Marco, contains St. Mark’s Basilica, which is tiled with Byzantine mosaics, and the Campanile bell tower offering views of the city’s red roofs.

Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy

The Leaning Tower of Pisa or simply the Tower of Pisa is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa, known worldwide for its nearly four-degree lean, the result of an unstable foundation. 

Colosseum, Rome Italy

Colosseum, also called Flavian Amphitheatre, giant amphitheatre built in Rome under the Flavian emperors. Construction of the Colosseum was begun sometime between 70 and 72 CE during the reign of Vespasian. It is located just east of the Palatine Hill, on the grounds of what was Nero’s Golden House. The artificial lake that was the centrepiece of that palace complex was drained, and the Colosseum was sited there, a decision that was as much symbolic as it was practical. Vespasian, whose path to the throne had relatively humble beginnings, chose to replace the tyrannical emperor’s private lake with a public amphitheatre that could host tens of thousands of Romans.

Vatican Museum, Vatican City

Vatican City, a city-state surrounded by Rome, Italy, is the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church. It’s home to the Pope and a trove of iconic art and architecture. Its Vatican Museums house ancient Roman sculptures such as the famed “Laocoön and His Sons” as well as Renaissance frescoes in the Raphael Rooms and the Sistine Chapel, famous for Michelangelo’s ceiling.

Trevi Fountain, Rome Italy

The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, Italy, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini and several others. Standing 26.3 metres high and 49.15 metres wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. We dropped our wallet while taking picture at the fountain and we were grateful to the person who tapped on our shoulder to inform us so that we could still retrieve it.